Dodai Stewart: Racist Hunger Games Fans Are Very Disappointed

http://jezebel.com/5896408/racist-hunger-games-fans-dont-care-how-much-money-the-movie-made?utm_campaign=socialflow_jezebel_facebook&utm_source=jezebel_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow

“These people are MAD that the girl that they cried over while reading the book was “some black girl” all along. So now they’re angry. Wasted tears, wasted emotions. It’s sad to think that had they known that she was black all along, there would have been [no] sorrow or sadness over her death.”

I haven’t read the book or seen the movie, but the screenshots of Facebook comments are scary.

LEANH NGUYEN, PH.D: "The Ethics of Trauma"

Link to my blog instead of directly to the article because it’s behind a paywall.
Well worth the $ 19.50 it costs.




“What you want to know, just ask me.” 

A beautifully honest paper on an excruciating theme:  



http://guilfordjournals.com/doi/pdf/10.1521/ijgp.2011.61.1.26 


Some quotes: 

During the Physicians for Human Rights evaluations of the Iraqis, some of the men laughed incredulously upon reading the questionnaires. One man looked at the items in a studious, puzzled way. Another said, “What is this?” One man pushed the questionnaire away in despair. “I can’t do this. I don’t understand
this.” Another man eventually refused to continue and said to me, “What you want to know, just ask me.”

Just ask me.

These reactions conveyed to me that the clinician-listener-witness was failing her traumatized subject in the task that the historian Dominick LaCapra (2001) has called “remaining in empathic unsettlement”: to stay unsettled in order to look at, not past or beyond, the subject. To stay in the not knowing and trying to know with the subject—such is the task that we may be failing when we unquestioningly engage in “empirical” standardized testing of traumatized people.

Ban Ki-moon: The Time Has Come.

From AllOut.org:

Earlier this month, U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon delivered an incredibly powerful speech at the U.N. in Geneva. It’s not every day that a major world figure speaks out forcefully in defense of equality. But most people didn’t even hear about it.

Why? Because a handful of delegates stormed out of the meeting in protest and their story – that gay people should be denied human rights – dominated the day’s news.


But we are about to change that. Our friends at the U.N. just let us REMIX Ban-Ki Moon (complete with a dance beat chosen by the team at All Out). Will you take just 2 minutes to listen to this incredibly inspiring speech and share with your friends and family? When someone like Ban Ki-Moon speaks out, it makes a difference – but only if people hear what he has to say:

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study

Thanks again to @Sigrun for the link:

http://www.cdc.gov/ace/index.htm

Quote:

The ACE Study findings suggest that certain experiences are major risk factors for the leading causes of illness and death as well as poor quality of life in the United States. Progress in preventing and recovering from the nation’s worst health and social problems is likely to benefit from understanding that many of these problems arise as a consequence of adverse childhood experience